Al-Qadim - Mecânicas

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Al-Qadim - Mecânicas

Mensagem por Leishuck Norris em Qua Maio 27, 2015 11:08 pm

Olá,
 
O jogo Al-Qadim – The Sands of Time utilizará como sistema o 13th Age, um OGL d20 cujo conteúdo se encontra no DriveThru RPG gratuitamente.

A diferença do material do SRD para o livro é a diagramação, as ilustrações e comentários dos designers que só são encontrados no livro.
 
Como o sistema tem sua base em cima do cenário que é apresentado junto com o livro, algumas adaptações são necessárias para aproximar as mecânicas com a proposta do cenário de Al-Qadim – por exemplo, no cenário do livro do 13th Age só existem Djinns e Efreetis, enquanto no Al-Qadim existem cinco tipos de gênios. As principais adaptações mecânicas que serão utilizadas no Al-Qadim – The Sands of Time foram feitas por Caoimhe Ora Snow, que disponibilizou gratuitamente na internet sua adaptação de regras alguns anos atrás. As adaptações realizadas por ela encontram-se na postagem abaixo – inicialmente muito material será mantido no inglês, com o tempo e a paciência eu vou transferindo pro português.
 
E, por fim, serão apresentadas as Houserules – porque não é jogo meu se não tiver houserule.
 
Bonanças.
 
Atenciosamente,
Leishuck Norris

_________________
"Se o Destino for mesmo um Moinho...
Nós somos a razão que o faz se mover."



"Avançamos acreditando na sua infalibilidade,
Para além de onde as forças se encontram."



"Somos todos histórias no final.
Apenas façamos com que ela seja boa."
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Adaptação 13th Age pra Al-Qadim I - Icons

Mensagem por Leishuck Norris em Sab Maio 30, 2015 9:04 pm

Icons of Zakhara

The Grand Caliph
Heroic Icon (~The Emperor)
Grand Caliph Khalil al-Assad al-Zahir (Master of the Enlightened Throne, Most High Sovereign of the Land of Fate, the Worthy of the Gods, Scourge of the Unbeliever, Confidant of the Genies) is the 18th man to sit upon the Enlightened Throne. All of Zakhara pays at least lip service to his rule.
 
The Sheikh
Heroic Icon (~The Great Gold Wyrm)
Sheikh Khaldun bin Hanif is the head of the largest al-badia tribe of the Haunted Lands, the House of Hanif, known by some as “our Grand Caliph's hunting dogs” for their unflinching support for the Enlightened leader of Zakhara.
 
The Slave General
Heroic Icon (~The Dwarf King)
Hatit Abd al-Wajib, a mamluk of the Dutiful, is the Emir of Qudra, the City of Power. Qudra, surrounded by massive walls and other military fortifications, is the center of mamluk power in the Free Cities and a staunch supporter of the Grand Caliph.
 
The Warrior Queen
Heroic Icon (~The Crusader)
Caliph Halima al-Wahsi is the tall, beautiful ruler of Ajayib, City of Wonders, the farthest west of the wealthy Cities of the Pearl. She is a warrior at heart and does battle with the savages in the nearby mountains on a regular basis.
 
The White Agate
Heroic Icon (~The Archmage)
With his skin blanched white by unknown means, the White Agate is an easily recognizable presence in Huzuz, although his magical duties preclude him from appearing often in the Enlightened Court. The White Agate is the most accomplished wizard of Zakhara and a major supporter of the Grand Caliph.
 
***
 
The Corsair Council
Ambiguous Icon (~The High Druid)
A rotating group of pirate captains based out of the corsair haven of Hawa, City of Chaos, the Corsair Council opposes the rule of the Grand Caliph and his enforcer, the Slave General.
 
The Genie Rulers
Ambiguous Icon (~The Three)
Although their power is primarily concentrated in their elemental domains, the rulers of the dao, djinn, efreet, and marids are known to take an interest in the material plane as well. Sometimes they cooperate – many times they don't.
 
The Imam
Ambiguous Icon (~The Priestess)
Rimaq al-Nimar, the Emir of I'tiraf, is the head of the Pantheist League and one of the most powerful individuals in all of Zakhara. He seeks to extend the fundamentalist rule of the Pantheon over the rest of the Grand Caliph's domains.
 
The Jann
Ambiguous Icon (~The Elf Queen)
The only genies native to the material plane, the Jann combine together all four elements – flame, sea, wind, and sand. Jann are fiercely loyal to their friends, and dangerously lethal to their enemies.
 
***
 
The Bonfire
Villainous Icon (~The Diabolist)
Head of the Brotherhood of the True Flame, the Bonfire is a mysterious figure who works to advance the aims of the Brotherhood and plots against the Grand Caliph.

The Ghul Lords
Villainous Icon (~The Lich King)
Masters of the undead, the rulers of the Pit of the Ghuls are looking to expand their power out beyond their isolated desert homes and wreak vengeance upon the living.
 
The Grandfather
Villainous Icon (~The Prince of Shadows)
The Caliph of Shadows, head of the Everlasting holy slayer fellowship, is the leader of a group of fanatical assassins dedicated to the god Hajama – and they will let no one live to oppose their goals.
 
The Silk Merchant
Villainous Icon (~The Orc Lord)
Mu'izzi al-Kamar, head of the long-established al-Kamari trading family, is one of the most successful merchants in Huzuz and in fact all Zakhara. His family is renowned for the quality of their silk garments and their wealth – a wealth which recently has been used in subtle opposition to the Grand Caliph.


_________________
"Se o Destino for mesmo um Moinho...
Nós somos a razão que o faz se mover."



"Avançamos acreditando na sua infalibilidade,
Para além de onde as forças se encontram."



"Somos todos histórias no final.
Apenas façamos com que ela seja boa."
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Adaptação 13th Age para Al-Qadim II - Backgrounds

Mensagem por Leishuck Norris em Sab Maio 30, 2015 9:22 pm

Backgrounds
 
Characters native to Zakhara are strongly encouraged to take a kit. It gives you a bonus on one background (although you can't go over the normal limit of +5). You can add words to the kit background to make it more specific, like “Holy Slayer of Haku” or “Askar from Hiyal.” If you really want to be a foreigner, you can, but you don't get the free +2 background.
 
Classes listed for each kit are recommendations; you can pick a kit even if your class isn't listed, but it probably won't make much sense unless you tweak the concept.
 
Unless otherwise specified, if you swap out a talent for another talent, you can take feats for the new talent.
 
Askar
Barbarian, Fighter, Paladin, Ranger.
Askars (AH-skarz) are the most common warriors of the Land of Fate, native to permanent settlements of any size. Intelligent and social, they are the backbone of defense, protecting their families, homes, and eventually even their countries. The optional feminine title is askara (AH-skar-ah).

Role:
Askars are citizens with fighting skills. Most warriors start this way—from rank-and-file soldiers to caravan guards to palace officials. Usually of common beginnings, askars can rise to well-respected positions through ability and prowess. Some even become rulers.
 
Members of this kit are more urbane and socially acceptable than other breeds of warriors. Even askars of rival villages, cities, or states share the bond of a similar background, which facilitates trade and communication. Askars tend to be more literate than warriors who are less settled. Merchants in particular hold askars in high regard, as they are dependable, predictable, and straightforward. In general, askars can be entrusted with missions of great import.

These warriors have but one flaw worth noting: a tendency toward chauvinism and provincial attitudes. Most askars believe that their respective homelands and cities are the finest in the world, to the exclusion of all others. At times the result can be serious, particularly in drinking establishments where religious patriotism runs as thick as the koumiss (a fermented drink) runs thin. This is normally a minor fault, however, easily forgiven by the wise.

Special Benefits:
You gain the background Askar +2 for free, and you can take the cleric talent Domain: War/Leadership instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Barber
Bard, Rogue.
The roguish barber is a tradition in the Land of Fate. One or more of them may be found in any bazaar, flashing their blades as well as their wit. Boldly they hawk their abilities and prowess—often while performing said tasks on their customers.
 
The historical barbers after which this kit is modeled performed more than just haircutting and grooming. They also served as doctors and surgeons of modest skill. Their talent with blades accounted in part for this medical bent. Equally important, barbers were well versed in the folk treatments and herbal medicines of the time. They learned of such things through long experience as well as by talking with customers.
 
Members of this kit are founts of information (especially NPC barbers). Like their predecessors, they gather much of their knowledge while practicing their trade at the bazaar. Often barbers can advise one on the best course of action; certainly they are eager to do so. Just as often, they may recommend a course of action that would prove disastrous if followed. Barbers are nearly always entertaining, but rarely are they allknowing.
 
Role: Barbers are cunning, streetwise showmen, gifted with quick wit and a glib tongue. It is said they'll try to talk you out of more than just your gold; they'll also try for the pouch that holds it, the belt from which the pouch hangs, and the pants that are held up by the belt.
 
In folk tales, barbers are often portrayed as mad or insane, threatening their customers with their tools— or, worse yet, driving customers to distraction with long, unproductive, meaningless stories, each of which digresses into another tale, and then another and another, thereby trapping the unfortunate customer, who becomes desperate for escape. Not all barbers of Zakhara are mad, of course. But their reputation as being even a bit crazed helps ensure that their customers hold still for their ministrations. (Hence, a little deliberate flamboyance never hurts.) Furthermore, a touch of insanity suggests that barbers know of what they speak when describing genies, their fabulous riches, and other Wonders — phenomenon that could certainly leave a person addled.
 
Barbers are most common in cities, where they are tolerated for their ability as well as their knowledge of rumors, gossip, and potentially valuable information. Those who stay long in one place are not held in great regard by the city's denizens. Mere barbers have been known to parlay their common sense and advice into positions at the right hand of a local sultan, emir, or caliph. On the other hand, less astute and less fortunate barbers have managed to make a muddle of their learning, and in doing so may barely escape town with their skins (Of course, a few bunglers may escape with someone else's skin, too).
 
In game play, barbers provide a way of introducing new information to the PCs, much as the standard tavern in other lands provides a starting point for adventures. Legends, rumors, tales of great riches—all reach the ears of barbers, who in turn relate these tidbits to the deserving and the worthy.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Barber +2 for free, and you can take the bard talent Storyteller instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Corsair
Fighter, Paladin
Corsairs are male and female warriors born to the sea, unencumbered by bulky armor, accustomed to swift moves and running battles over open water. She is the daring merchant-princess, he the cunning rogue; together they are bold explorers. While the early Zakharan peoples were born to the desert, they soon became practiced in the ways of the sea, and dominated trade (and piracy) in the Waters surrounding their empire.
 
Role: Corsairs successfully bring to the sea lanes the same virtues that have worked so well for their desertborn cousins — bravery, honesty among allies, leadership by example, and advancement by merit. However, corsairs are not tethered to land-based organizations or leaders; they are the master of their own universe when at the helm of a ship.
 
Corsairs exist on the borders of society. They are continual travelers between the great seaports, with no single place to call their home. Many are explorers, seeking out new lands and adventures. Others are pirates and freebooters, looking to loot as much as possible from their prey. Upon "retiring," corsairs often become simple sea merchants, following common routes and carrying traditional cargos. Yet even in the hearts of these old sea dogs a fire burns—a passion that may lead them to accept one "last" great adventure.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Corsair +2 for free, and you can take Corsair Fighting Style instead of two of your class talents.
 
Corsair Fighting Style
When wearing light armor, you gain the benefit of the ranger talents Double Melee Attack and Two-Weapon Mastery. You can select the feats that correspond to each of these talents.
 
***
 
Desert Rider
Barbarian, Fighter, Paladin, Ranger
Desert riders represent the classic Arabian warriors: well-trained, mounted fighters sweeping out of the barren wastes. They are the romantic heroes of a nomadic people, living their lives and fighting their battles from the saddle. Desert riders are primarily horsemen, but some are more adept at riding camels.
 
Role: Opinions on the nature of desert riders vary according to whom you ask. To the nomadic tribes, desert riders are heroes, exemplifying the traditions of the desert: bravery, honesty, and freedom. To the small towns that are sometimes targets of raids, the riders are little more than wandering thieves and haughty looters, who sweep into civilized lands for raids, then "turn tail" and disappear into the desert to avoid pursuit. Both opinions are partly right. There are indeed good and lawful desert riders who exemplify the positive values of the desert. And there are evil men and women who live up to the villainy portrayed by the townsfolk. But the true nature of the group lies somewhere between those two poles.
 
In turn, desert riders tend to view city-dwellers as impoverished cousins, unaware that the greatest riches are those of the soul, not knowing that such rewards can only be found in the freedom of the desert. Desert riders of good alignment tend to demonstrate the inherent superiority of their life (which accounts for the haughty attitude perceived by the townsfolk). Evil desert riders see the towns and villages as mere supply houses for needed material.
 
The desert riders are not bound to land and property, save for their most important possessions, their mounts. A desert rider only grudgingly parts with his or her steed, and then only if it is left with others who might appreciate its quality—that is, other desert riders, or individuals who both appreciate the value of the steed and who can be trusted to take care of it until the owner returns. Desert riders do sell their mounts on occasion, especially horses that have grown old. Even then, buyers are often chosen carefully.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Desert Rider +2 for free, and you can take Bonded Mount instead of two of your class talents. You can select Animal Companion feats to improve your mount.
 
Bonded Mount
Special: Unlike most class talents, this talent takes up two class talent slots.
You gain the benefit of the ranger talent Animal Companion with a camel or a horse.
Mount (camel, horse)
Acts: After rider.
Advantage: You gain a +1 bonus on attack rolls when mounted on your mount.
 
***
 
Elemental Mage
Sorcerer, Wizard
Elemental mages specialize in one of the four elemental provinces: sand, sea, flame, or wind. They gain great power and control within that province, but lose their ability to cast spells from any of the remaining three.
 
Role: Elemental wizards are rare in the Land of Fate, and a great deal of mystery and suspicion accompanies them. Upon encountering spellcasters, most folk assume them to be standard sorcerers, or perhaps even the more unpredictable sha'irs. Once a caster is known to be one of the purely elemental wizards, distrust and suspicion grow.
 
Natives assume that all elemental mages are gathered in brotherhoods committed to a given province—and not necessarily for the betterment of those around them. The reason behind these impressions is the Brotherhood of the True Flame. The "Brotherhood" is an organization of flame wizards who make no bones about their aims. They believe that the only true magery is that of fire. Further, they believe that all wizards who are not elemental mages in flame must convert—that is, come under their control—or die. The Brotherhood maintains chapters and related bodies in all major cities of the land. The organization also maintains close ties with several holy slayer (assassin) organizations. Despite common beliefs to the contrary, mages devoted to sand, wind, or sea do not have this level of organization, nor do they have similar aims. But the known existence of the Brotherhood brings suspicion on all elemental mages.
 
No PC specializing in flame may begin the campaign as a member of the Brotherhood. The organization accepts only evil members, and it carefully observes all those who are not members. Should a PC perform "well" (slaying mages who are not flame wizards and acting in a generally evil manner, for example), he or she may be invited to participate in the Brotherhood's initiation rites. Should a PC behave in a good manner, aiding non-Brotherhood members or associating with the like, the Brotherhood may label the PC as an enemy, and target the rogue flame mage for eventual termination. The same may occur if someone simply refuses an invitation to undergo the initiation rites.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Elemental Mage +2 for free, and you can take Secret of the True Flame instead of one of your class talents, if you're a flame mage. Sea mages, sand mages, and wind mages don't have a specific talent they can choose.
 
Secret of the True Flame
You have learned the secret to using the power of the True Flame. If a spell does acid, cold, lightning, or thunder damage, you can change the damage type to fire. You gain resist fire 12+.
Adventurer Feat: Your resistance becomes resist fire 16+.
 
***
 
Ethoist
Cleric
While the "wandering priest" of a god or pantheon may be a pragmatic individual, the faithful clerics who maintain the temples, mosques, and monasteries are a more organized breed. These men and women provide a sense of continuity and permanence to the lives of the believers around them. It is they who make the call for prayers, they who deliver the sermons, they who perform the daily tasks required by the gods. If pragmatists are the hands of the faith, and moralists the heart, then ethoists are the mind. Specialty priests may not be ethoists.
 
Role: Ethoists tend to be the most methodical and level-headed Clerics of Order. They manage day-today operations and see to it that needs of the faithful are met, as well as the needs of the deity or deities they venerate. Most organized faiths have ethoist factions. Player characters in need of healing are most likely to find aid from such ethoists.
 
Even so, members of the ethoist branch realize that to grow and develop, individuals should be encouraged to see the world, and to carry the word of the faithful to others. For this reason, young priests of a mosque or monastery are often granted a leave of absence to adventure and explore. A few strictures apply. Before such youths leave, they must declare their plans (e.g., direction, actions, traveling companions). While away, they must keep records of their actions and activities in the nature of the faith. And upon reaching another outpost of their particular faith, they must turn these records over to the local ethoists and sit for interviews, telling their tales and adventures. These oral reports last about an hour for every three days out, and ethoist priests should prepare their schedules accordingly.
 
Upon attaining sufficient level, ethoists are expected to settle down and set up their own local church, or to aid a larger city mosque. There are notable exceptions, however, such as the Al-Itimad Traveling Revival Movement, which swept through the coastal towns for many decades until the untimely death of its leader.
 
Most clerics of the Faith Ethical disapprove of those who worship gods which they do not — even if the "misguided" happen to be ethoists, too. The ethoist world view can be summed up as follows: "Other faiths are all very nice, but they are quite wrong, you know. Only our faith is the one true way. Not that we're pushing, mind you."
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Priest of the Faith Ethical +2 for free, and you can take the paladin talent Path of Universal Righteous Endeavor instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Faris
Fighter, Paladin, Ranger
A holy war is more than just a mobilization of an army in a religious fervor. In Zakhara, it is also an opportunity for spiritual redemption for those fighting the war; if they fight the good fight, their souls will be redeemed, regardless of any past sins. Since no mortal is without sin, the opportunity for a free pass to the paradisiacal afterlife is hard to pass up. A holy war is thus a "good war," one which enjoys the popular support of its people. Warriors engaged in it are not mindless slaves blinded by literal adherence to holy texts; rather, they are popular, living champions of their people and their faith.
 
The farisan (FARE-iss-ahn) of the Land of Fate are such warriors. They are devoted to their cause, drawing power from the faith of the people, acting as model champions. The unisex title is faris (FARE-iss). The optional feminine title is farisa (FARE-iss-ah).
 
Role: Farisan are champions of their faith and their people, in that order. Each warrior is bound tightly to one faith and one deity or recognized pantheon, much more so than even paladins, who are often attracted to the concepts of "good" and "law" in and of themselves, without concerning gods.
 
This devotion to faith does not negate the thought processes of the farisan. One popular legend about this group describes a faris who is deceived by an evil priest into acting against his god. The holy warrior recovers himself, slays the priest, and goes on to fight valiantly in the service of his deity. This legend has several variations, and the class of tale is dubbed tahrik min qad, which means "moving through the flame."
 
Farisan also feel a concern for the common people. This is not restricted to folk who share the respective faiths of the farisan; it includes all who may be brought to the "true path" that a faris professes. Leaders, wealthy merchants, scribes, and adventurous types are usually thave their own agendas; they receive less concern. But common folk — herdsmen, artisans, small merchants, and the like — can be brought into the fold. Farisan seek always to conduct themselves in a manner that inspires the common folk. The willingness to die for one's cause is part of that inspiration.
 
Within this normal role there exists a wide latitude for farisan personalities, ranging from firebrands and berserk warriors to more thoughtful planners and popular leaders. The clergy are well served by farisan, and a number of holy warriors are among their retainers and bodyguards.
 
Some farisan are intolerant of clergymen and holy warriors with other belief systems, including paladins. Such groups are perceived as wrong-headed rivals who seek to lead the people astray through their false concepts. Under the best of conditions, this dislike is manifested in a redoubled effort by farisan to prove that their own faith is more secure, their own life more worth living than that of a rival (even a rival faris). Under the worst of conditions, it results in the intolerant holy war, sweeping a land clean like a desert wind.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Faris +2 for free, and you can take the paladin talent Cleric Training instead of one of your class talents.
 
***

Hakima
Cleric
More than a few tales from the Arabian Nights portray intelligent and outspoken women with mystical abilities. The hakima kit is modeled after such extraordinary characters. A hakima's gaze can penetrate the veils of magic and lies to perceive the underlying truth. Although her other abilities are limited, the hakima's insight is highly valued both in the desert and the cities of Zakhara.
 
Hakimas (hah-KEEM-ahs) must be female clerics, and they must have a Wisdom of 15 or higher.
 
Role: Wise women are not fighters or aggressors by nature, but they still know how to defend themselves. Most of their spells are defensive. They are the keepers of the home fires, the protectors of the family, and the unifier of tribes. They may rise in power to be leaders themselves, or guide others along the path to greatness. (Although women in the Land of Fate are treated with great equality compared to those in Western history, most Zakharan leaders are male.) A wise woman does not normally contest others directly; instead she opposes them more subtly, more cleverly, with champions and feints and challenges. A sultan could choose no one better than a loyal hakima to be the leader of his household, as well as his favored confidant and domestic spy.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Hakima +2 for free, and you can take the wizard spell Utility instead of one of your class spells.
 
***
 
Holy Slayer
Rogue
Holy slayers are the ghosts of the deserts. They mete out justice and threats in a manner that intimidates and frightens most foreigners as well as many Zakharans. Also called assassins, these characters view an opposing army or nation as a great beast to be slaughtered, or at least confused by the severing of its head. Sometimes the mere warning that a holy slayer is nearby is enough to turn away those who seek to harm the assassin's people.
 
The holy slayers of Arabian history were also assassins whose stories were wrapped in myth and legend. Originally, they were a radical faction of the faithful. Their leader sequestered himself within a great, secret mountain in the desert. There (as the story goes), young recruits were drugged. When they awoke, they were told they had been carried into heaven, to a garden of earthly delights. The youths dallied in this "paradise" for some time, then were drugged again and returned to the leader's quarters. When they regained consciousness, they were offered the opportunity to serve the holy cause as warriors of the faith. The bait: the promise that they would be readmitted to the garden after death, to spend eternity in paradise. Many young recruits agreed. They joined the "Grandfather" of assassins, fearless in their conviction that even if they died, they would be better off in the next world.
 
Tales of such a secret society have changed through the centuries. "Assassin" has come to mean a mercenary killer who takes contracts out on his or her fellow citizens in the same way a mason would accept a contract to lay bricks. But the legendary characters after which this kit is modeled had the power of faith, even if misplaced faith, and an organization behind them.
 
In the Land of Fate, there are a number of fellowships comprising such assassins—or as they are more commonly called, holy slayers. Each fellowship is a religious organization dedicated to the advancement of its particular faith (Some might compare these groups to the historical Knights Templar of the Western church). Such organizations usually have the support of moralist clergymen, but vary in their intolerance of other factions. Each fellowship operates from a secret location, which is unknown to lowranking members.
 
Role: Holy slayers operate under as many restrictions as paladins, their antithesis. Members of this kit were literally created to follow the orders of the Grandfather or Grandmother of their respective organizations. They must be willing to die immediately for their cause. If a leader should ask a holy slayer to leap from a building to prove his or her faith, the holy slayer does so without question. Unfortunately for assassins, leaders often ask exactly that, in order to prove their power.
 
Holy slayers are not required to announce their profession to the general public. While a few fellowships encourage such displays, members who do so may be told to perform extremely dangerous missions in order to prove that they are worthy. Most fellowships prefer to operate in secrecy. To disguise their identity, holy slayers often attempt to imitate other kits such as beggar-thieves, matruds, or sa'luks. In such cases, holy slayers lose none of their normal abilities. Nor do they gain the special benefits of the "cover" kit, though smart assassins often pretend they do. At a minimum, it's a good idea to feign the cover kit's hindrances.
 
Assassins who are not based at their fellowship's secret hideout are allowed to act as free agents for a time, much like priests who are not currently attached to a particular church or mosque. These free agents are allowed to live their lives in a normal fashion.
However, as soon as word comes from the Grandfather or Grandmother, they are expected to perform whatever actions are ordered. They are not expected to ask for additional aid or time, nor may they appeal the decision. They are expected only to do or die.
 
NPC holy slayers rarely if ever ignore such orders. They are willing to die for their faith. However, those rare player characters who belong to this kit are not automatons. They may ignore the orders of their leader if they choose, especially if death is the likely outcome of those orders. (Of course, death may be the outcome of refusing an order, too.) Holy slayers who disobey become outcasts. The same applies to those who "obey" in part, but have managed to twist the meaning of an order through clever interpretation of the wording.
 
Outcasts become the target of attacks by other members of their fellowship. These attacks are planned by the DM. Rather than kill a target outright, fellowships usually prefer a string of nasty assaults—for example, the kidnapping of allies, the destruction of home towns, or the summoning of monsters. These attacks take place at the worst possible moments. They continue until one of the following occurs: the PC decides to complete the assigned mission; the PC has survived a number of separate attacks equal to his or her level (at which point the Grandfather or Grandfather may consider the punishment sufficient, if the DM so chooses); or the PC slays the current leader of his or her fellowship (which is why the location of a fellowship's base is kept so secret).
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Holy Slayer +2 for free, and you can take the paladin feature Smite Evil instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Kahin
Cleric
Kahins (KAH-hins) are idol-priests, believing that divinity is found in all things, and that through worship of certain items of power, they may come to understand the ebb and flow of mystical power and divinity in the universe. Their beliefs apparently predate the worship of the known gods of Zakhara, though their records are primarily verbal as opposed to written, kept for generations by other kahins and sympathetic rawuns. Kahins claim to draw their strength from the basic energy of the land itself, though they do respect gods of the earth, agriculture, and the desert. Some outlanders from the North mistakenly call them druids, because both groups have similar attitudes, abilities, advancement, and spells. Like druids, kahins believe that all forces are in balance — but from the kahins' viewpoint, they are continually moving against one another. The kahin symbol is six arrows arranged in an arc, all pointed downward.
 
Characters must have a Wisdom of at least 12 and a Constitution of at least 14 to qualify. The unisex title is kahin (KAH-hin). The optional feminine title is kahina (KAH-hin-ah).
 
Role: The eternal balancers, kahins are more devoted to the land, which is everlasting, than to people, who like matches are struck once and then extinguished. "The land" includes all expanses of nature, from desert to sea, arid waste to verdant valley. In fact, to destroy the desert would be as great a crime to kahins as torching a field. For this reason kahins are often considered obstructions to the growth of cities and consequently to the power of the merchant classes.
 
Kahins are wanderers and teachers, instructing men and women to live within their boundaries rather than expanding to excessive lengths. These clerics have the most amiable relationship with others who live in peace with the environment, such as desert riders,
mystics, and corsairs. Kahins are more uneasy with those who are severed from the land and who are by nature city-dwellers — for example, merchant-rogues and the organized clergy.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Kahin +2 for free, and you can take Access to Sorcery instead of one of your class talents. Or you could wait until 13 True Ways comes out, and play a druid.
 
Access to Sorcery
Starting at 3rd level, you can take a sorcerer spell in place of a cleric spell that is 2 levels higher than it. For example, you can take a 1st level sorcerer spell in place of a 3rd level cleric spell.
 
***
 
Mamluk
Fighter, Paladin, Ranger
Rearing a cadre of professional warriors is a historical tradition in the Arab world. These male professionals began their training at a young age as slaves, either purchased for that purpose or captured in raids and combat. The slaves then underwent rigorous training, not only in combat and tactics, but also in government. Such slave warriors became the professional infrastructure of Turkey in the 16th century, where they were called janissaries. They achieved the same stature in Egypt during the 13th and 14th centuries, where they were given the name mamluks (mahm-LUKES).
 
While the impressment of slavery upon young boys is strange and frightening to modern eyes, the mamluk system had a number of advantages. These young men were not only trained for war. They also operated the civil service. With no hereditary ties, advancement depended on ability, not birth-station, and the lowliest warrior could rise to the position of army commander or vizier on his own merit. Further, given the ability to bring the best candidates forward to the highest positions, both the historical janissaries and the mamluks ended up ruling their respective countries.
 
The mamluk kit of Zakhara is modeled after these historical figures, with one addition: females join the ranks. Boys and girls are trained in separate units, however, and remain segregated until they have risen well up the chain of command (something only a few achieve). The optional feminine title is mamluka (mahm-LUKE-ah).
 
Role: An intelligent slave-labor force, mamluks keep the militia and government moving forward. In the countries they serve, they are regarded as the main support of civilization. That is not to say that all individual mamluks are held in high regard. But some do gain sufficient power and prestige after proving themselves to be capable leaders and warriors.
 
Outstanding mamluks are visibly rewarded, and set a goal for all other members of the force. Mamluks, despite their officially enslaved status, disapprove of slavery unless the enslaved are given a chance to better themselves. Other practices are a waste of manpower, in their opinion.
 
Mamluks follow a strict chain of command. Experience level is considered to be equivalent to the warrior's direct rank within the mamluk hierarchy. A lower-level (and therefore lower-ranking) mamluk is expected to follow the orders of a higher-level individual without question.
 
Outside the nations in which they are common, mamluks are treated at best as curiosities, at worst as agents of the powers they represent, or as examples of horrid slave practices. "I'll sell you to the mamluks" is a common threat used to discipline children in
neighboring lands. Children are not taken into servitude in their own countries (Nor, for that matter, will a mamluk's children become slaves; they are free to choose their own destinies.).
 
Mamluks in the Land of Fate wear simple facial tattoos to indicate their rank and organization. Common tattoos include lines, circles, or patterns on either or both cheeks, or on the forehead. The more ornate the design, the more powerful the mamluk. Imitating mamluk designations for rank, or giving oneself a higher rank artificially, is grounds for severe punishment in mamluk societies.
 
Individuals from rival mamluk societies tend to recognize each other with respect. However, a mamluk is under no compunction to follow orders from someone of another society, even if the other mamluk is of greater power.
 
PC mamluks often receive a leave of absence from their own organization to gather information or perform reconnaisance. They are expected to report what they learn to their superiors. No time limit is provided for such leaves, which are usually granted to exceptional, strong-willed individuals. It is hoped that either the individuals will gain the field experience they need to become better warriors, or — if they are truly unworthy — that they will die in a fashion that does not endanger other mamluks.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Mamluk +2 for free, and you can take the bard feature Battle Cries instead of two of your class talents.
 
***
 
Matrud
Bard, Rogue
Matruds (mah-TROODS) are desert thieves, outcast from their tribes, shunned by former comrades and family, surviving at the margins of their former society. The cause of their rejection may or may not have been just, but in any case matruds have lost both their possessions and their former position. As a result, they live for survival and for revenge. They have become rebels and raiders, striking against both the desert tribes and the settled folk, seeking to grab a slice of what they feel is justifiably theirs.
 
The unisex title is matrud (mah-TROOD). The optional feminine title is matruda (mah-TROOD-ah).
 
Role: Matruds may be found everywhere in Zakhara, from the sea to the desert. Among the desert tribes, they are renowned as horse-thieves. All are motivated by their own plight. Outcast and without social position, they think of themselves first, and the rest of the world not at all. From their perspective, the Land of Fate has done them no favors, brought them no boons — so why should they be concerned with the fate of others?
 
Matruds are transient, and most take on jobs that even beggars would refuse. The key difference between beggars and matruds is that the latter have no aversion to hard work, particularly if it places them in a position where they can steal. These rogues tend to move quickly from job to job, hoping to stay one leap ahead of trouble. Many corrupt bureaucrats began their career as matruds.
 
The matruds are marginal individuals. In the cities, they are little better than beggars, but without the benefit of great numbers. Sometimes matruds form small bands of raiders. Distrust and suspicion of one another keep the association loose at best. Leadership in such bands is by the strongest, and slaying the previous leader is considered sufficient recommendation for the position.
 
Matruds who become successful rarely return to their native tribes. Instead they seek to hoard their gold, gems, and magic, creating strongholds defended by tricks and traps (because even loyal retainers may be bribed). Matruds give little more than lip service to the Zakharan principle of hospitality and good will. Honor has become a matter of surviving without helping or being helped by others. They trust no one. To the matruds, all men are thieves — whatever their stated profession. The matruds continually strive to protect themselves against such thievery.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Matrud +2 for free, and you can take the ranger talent First Strike instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Mercenary Savage
Barbarian, Fighter, Ranger
Not all actual Arabian civilizations relied upon an army of slave-soldiers such as the mamluks. Many raised strong armies the old-fashioned way: they bought them. Mercenaries were common. In fact, Turkish mercenaries during the time of the Abbasids came to control Baghdad and its rulers.
 
Such historical mercenaries had varied roots: hill tribes, plainsmen, and jungle warriors. The same is true of mercenary barbarians in Zakhara. They have left their native lands to fight for others in a distant realm, in exchange for money, land, or simply for a chance to escape their former lives. They find themselves in a strange region that considers itself more cultured than they, yet looks to them for protection and might.
 
Players who choose this kit must declare the origin of their characters — hill, jungle, or plains. Desert is not an option.
 
Role: Most of the Zakharan peoples who employ mercenary barbarians consider them at best a necessary evil and at worst a cause for civil insurrection. When barbarians interact with those who are not of the same homeland, all reaction checks are made with a 2-point penalty to the dice, and the highest reaction is "indifferent," never "friendly." Barbarians may clean up their dress and carry shining swords, but nothing can cover their hideous mangling of language and their seemingly illbred manners. Having served in war alongside others does not improve their reputation.
 
Unlike mamluks, mercenary barbarians don't tend to pull together as a common group. In part this is because they come from so many different backgrounds. However, even those originating from the same area may be rivals. This lack of kinship does not mean that mercenaries cannot band together and fight as an effective unit; a job is a job. Given a choice, however, the typical mercenary barbarian prefers to fight alone or with a handful of trusted friends, letting the genies take the rest.
 
Barbarian mercenaries who are PCs are considered to have been hired for a brief (and uneventful) time, then cut loose (either after losing a battle, or more often because they were assigned some garrison duty and then not paid). The overriding motto that a mercenary barbarian develops is this: be sure to get half the first month's pay up front.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Mercenary Savage +2 for free, and you can take the fighter talent Power Attack instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Merchant
Bard, Rogue
Not all merchants are out-and-out thieves (despite the protestations of many cash-poor PCs to the contrary). Many, however, are rogues, and they exemplify the social nature of the thief class: they are friendly, willing to do business, and try not to steal too much from their targets (after all, poor targets don't have that much to steal the next time). Such merchantrogues are the focus of this kit. They may be found anywhere — at sea, in a desert caravan, or operating a small booth in a bazaar.
 
Role: Merchant-rogues tread a fine line between honest trade and swindling, and their definition of both is quite loose. Ultimately, however, trade is their lifeblood, not outright theft. Success in the marketplace may cover up a multitude of smaller sins, but if those sins get out of hand, they stifle the very trade that makes them possible. Merchants are as honest as they have to be; if they obviously cheat their customers and fellow businessmen, they'll soon have no trade left. Further, the forces of law and order tend to frown on wholesale gouging, the diluting of goods, and cheating the public. Therefore, such manners are to be avoided (except, of course, when a really juicy profit can be made).
 
Most Zakharans assume that any merchant is little more than a rogue — not just members of this kit. That makes the life of a merchant-rogue much easier. After all, the public is not expecting fair and free trade, so why confuse them by acting in a totally honorable manner? Haggling is also expected in the marketplace, and the buyer should always seek to be as informed as possible before approaching the stall. No merchant in his or her right mind would negate a sale by telling the outright truth about a product.
 
The motto of many merchant-rogues is this: "It's legitimate as long you don't get caught." They have few qualms about dealing in stolen (or, rather, "previously owned") merchandise, provided the original owners cannot trace the sale. If a powerful or wealthy patron quietly requests a special item, merchant-rogues may even engage in a little thievery themselves.
 
As noted earlier, merchant-rogues are not confined to the marketplace or even a settlement. While there are good profits to be made in sales, there are even better fortunes to be made in the company of brave adventurers who slay monsters and have first dibs on treasure. Indeed, for the merchant-rogue sufficiently protected by these brave souls, a great amount of wealth is waiting to be acquired.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Merchant +2 for free, and you can take the rogue talent Smooth Talk instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Mystic Prophet
Cleric
Lone figures who stride out of the desert, mystics are strange and flamboyant Free Priests whose words have moved armies and are said to have moved mountains. They require no conventional channels to hear the gods' words, and they shun the convenience of an orthodox hierarchy. At times they are allies of hierarchical clerics, but just as often they are foes. Mystics bring new revelations and new ideas — often gained through euphoric dancing, meditative trances, and other exotic means. At best, the organized church finds their ideas difficult to accept.
 
Role: Mystics are Free Priests, and while they may worship the same god or gods as their more organized cousins in the hierarchy, they follow their own agenda, one which may be at odds with that of the ordered faiths. For that reason, the extremely conservative moralists have no love of mystics of any stripe, and the feeling is mutual.
 
There are as many types of mystics as there are mystics themselves, all of whom receive their revelations and priestly magics in a different fashion. Dervishes receive spells after inducing euphoria or a higher level of consciousness through wild and energetic dancing. For anchorites and hermits, solitude and meditation open a pathway to the gods. Some mystics sing, engage in simple work, take long walks, or employ other means to receive their spells. In this way, the mystics gain their spells much as standard priests gain enlightenment, with similar time requirements.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Mystic Prophet +2 for free, and you can take the barbarian talent Whirlwind instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Pragmatist
Cleric
Pragmatists are clerics of the common folk. They believe that others can easily be shown the true course in life through example and debate. Free to wander far from their temples, they are the most common cleric encountered in the Land of Fate. They preach tolerance among conflicting religions and gods, and they promote mediation over religious conflict. This is not to say that they cannot fight, nor will they hesitate to do so when confronted with a threat to themselves, their respective faiths, or their people.
 
Role: Pragmatists are considered the most understanding and even-tempered of clerics. They are usually found on the front line of their particular ethos. For instance, those who worship gods of healing are found in hospices, while those venerating gods of war work with military units.
 
Further, the organized church tends to provide great leeway for the actions and whereabouts of their pragmatic brethren. Long disappearances are not uncommon. And it is not unreasonable for a pragmatist to hold a single position for only a few months before moving on, either to another town or to a life of adventure, while preaching and living up to the tenets of his or her faith.
 
Pragmatists tend to be tolerant of other faiths, and pragmatists from opposing religions or of dissimilaralignments may be found in the same party, bound together by a common goal. The best summary of pragmatist thought is this: "All faiths have good points, and we may learn and make our own faith stronger through interacting with those faiths."
 
All religions in Zakhara have a pragmatist wing, even the heavily moralist pantheon. The most popular church among pragmatists is the Temple of Ten Thousand Gods, which in theory includes every deity ever known, as well as those who are yet to be discovered or born.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Priest of the Faith Pragmatic +2 for free, and you can take the bard talent Balladeer instead of one of your class talents, except that you give a sermon instead of singing and playing music.
 
***
 
Rawun
Bard
Rawuns (rah-OONS) are the bards of the desert tribes — the tale-spinners, the lore-keepers, and the entertainers. Each is entrusted with the legends of his or her own tribe, as well as other tribes contacted. Rawuns are the master poets of their peoples, and most of their knowledge is repeated through epic poems.
 
Rawuns may be found in most desert tribes. The most powerful of them act as advisors to a sheikh or tribal leader. In more urban areas, members of this kit run the gamut from bazaar entertainers to viziers serving a sultan.
 
The unisex title is rawun (rah-OON). The optional female title is rawuna (rah-OON-ah). In some regions, and in their own formal poetry, the plural is rawunin (We've used
the anglicized plural in this text.).
 
Role: Rawuns are blessed with a strong memory and an even stronger voice. In more cultured areas, they are well read, and their verses are captured on paper. In the tribal lands of the desert — where paper may be considered excess weight to a traveling people — rawuns are the keepers of all knowledge, the memory of their tribes. No tomes or scrolls hold their stories.
 
Members of this kit are competent and entertaining, glib and smooth in the manner of their outlander cousins, but with a deep, abiding regard for both tradition and art. As a group, they tend to be showy. Citified rawuns often don rich cloaks dripping with jewels, while those among desert tribes prefer simple but stunning white robes, trimmed with gold.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Rawun +2 for free, and you can take Influence Evil Eye instead of one of your class talents.
 
Influence Evil Eye
You can use this talent once per day. You can remove the effects of the Evil Eye upon someone, or you can call it down on them. To remove the Evil Eye, the target must make an easy saving throw (6+). To afflict someone else with the Evil Eye, make an average saving throw (11+). On a success, the target is afflicted; on a failure, you are afflicted instead.
 
Evil Eye
The effects of the Evil Eye last until the effect is removed by a genie or a rawun. If you have the Evil Eye upon you, you take a -2 penalty on skill checks and any positive relationships with icons become conflicted.
 
***
 
Sa'luk
Bard, Rogue
Sa'luks (sah-LUKES) are free adventurers, owing ties to no one and nothing. They pass freely from the wild cultures of the desert and the steppe to those of the city and the sea and back again with ease. They tend no herds, raise no crops, and produce no craft. They are freebooters, con artists, and swindlers. They survive by tricking, robbing, or simply outsmarting those who have greater riches. The unisex title is sa'luk. The optional feminine title is sa'luka (sah-LOO-kah). The plural, sa'luks, has been anglicized.
 
Role: Sa'luks are traditionally without property or possession. Their lack of material ties gives them a mobility that many other classes and kits lack. In a sense, all rogues become sa'luks when they follow the free-wheeling path of adventure, living fully and for the moment. Hence, this kit represents the least specialized rogue of all — the common thief who is quite happy to survive by theft and finesse.
 
Sa'luks tend to think little of the moneyed classes. When they have a bit of silver themselves, they often spend it on baubles. Should they find great wealth, they may buy estates, throw great parties, and shower others with gifts. Once their funds are exhausted, the scoundrels disappear into the night (leaving unhappy creditors behind). Starting fresh in a different location, they begin to amass yet another fortune. If in the process the sa'luks can embarrass a few merchants, and perhaps topple a despotic regime, so much the better.
 
Special Benefits: You gain the background Sa'luk +2 for free, and you can take the cleric talent Domain: Love/Beauty instead of one of your class talents.
 
***
 
Sha'ir
Wizard
The legendary sha'irs were tale-spinners and advisors to desert chieftains, serving them in much the same way as Merlin advised Arthur in western legend. They were imbued with great wisdom, and boasted the power to communicate with the desert's awesome spirits, the genies.
 
The sha'irs of the AL-QADIM™ campaign are modeled after these legendary figures. They, too, can communicate with genies. But they are more than advisors to chieftains. Members of the sha'ir kit are often found alone, as free agents, unfettered by social requirement and position. They may be found in the city as well as the desert, commanding great power from their dealings with genies. Instead of merely advising rulers, they may be rulers. The unisex title is sha'ir (shah-EER). The optional feminine title, preferred by traditionalists, is sha'ira (shah-EER-ah).
 
Role: Sha'irs are regarded as enigmatic and powerful figures in the Land of Fate. They do not gain spells in the manner of other wizards. Instead, they acquire their magics and enchantments through the workings of genies. Because genies are a mighty force in the Land of Fate, many would-be attackers think twice before offending a sha'ir — especially attackers who don't have their own sha'irs and genies supporting them.
 
Special Benefits:  You gain the background Sha'ir +2 for free, and you must take Sha'ir Magic instead of two of your class talents.
 
Sha'ir Magic
Special: Unlike most class talents, this talent takes up two wizard class talent slots.
 
You gain a gen familiar – a small elemental spirit connected to one of the four elemental quarters: flame, wind, sea, and sand. This functions as a normal wizard's familiar.
 
You don't memorize your spells the way normal wizards do. Instead, your spells are fetched for you by your gen.
 
It is a standard action to send your gen to find a spell. Name a spell that you wish the gen to retrieve; the gen disappears between planes to seek it out. At the beginning of your next turn, and the beginning of each subsequent turn until your gen returns, roll 1d8. If you roll the value of the escalation die or lower, your gen returns.
 
Roll 1d20 to determine if the gen successfully locates the spell:
• Any one Utility spell, sha'ir's level or less: 6+
• Cantrip: 6+
• At-Will, sha'ir's level or less: 6+
• Recharge or once per battle, sha'ir's level or less: 11+
• Daily, sha'ir's level or less: 16+
• Wizard spell: any success
• Non-wizard spell: even success
 
On an odd success or failure, you can retry to gain the same spell again that day. On an even success or failure, you cannot.
 
You can only have one spell ready to cast at any given time. Once you cast a daily spell, it is cast and you can't cast it again. You get to roll to recharge your spell if it is a recharge spell. If your spell is an at-will spell, you can use it at-will as long as you retain the spell. Spells can only be retained for 30 minutes if not cast.



_________________
"Se o Destino for mesmo um Moinho...
Nós somos a razão que o faz se mover."



"Avançamos acreditando na sua infalibilidade,
Para além de onde as forças se encontram."



"Somos todos histórias no final.
Apenas façamos com que ela seja boa."
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Adaptação 13th Age para Al-Qadim III - Talentos Feiticeiro e Icons

Mensagem por Leishuck Norris em Sab Maio 30, 2015 9:26 pm

Sorcerers & Icons

These five talents replace the other Heritage talents for sorcerers in an Al-Qadim setting.
 
Arcane Heritage
(The White Agate)
As Arcane Heritage (Archmage) on page 136 of the 13th Age Core Book.
 
Four Quarters Heritage
(The Jann)
As Infernal Heritage (Diabolist) on page 137 of the 13th Age Core Book.
Adventurer Feat: You gain resist energy damage 12+ to two of the following types of energy of your choice: acid, cold, fire, lightning, thunder.
 
Genie Blood Heritage
(The Genie Rulers)
As Chromatic Destroyer Heritage (The Three) on page 137 of the 13th Age Core Book.
Epic Feat: One battle per day, gain resist genie attack 16+ (all attacks made by genies; genie must roll natural 16+ with the attack or it deals only half damage).
 
Pit of the Ghuls Heritage
(The Ghul Lords)
As Undead Remnant Heritage (Lich King) on page 138 of the 13th Age Core Book.
 
True Flame Heritage
(The Bonfire)
The power of the True Flame burns brightly within you. You can always choose fire instead of rolling a random energy type.
Adventurer Feat: On a miss with a fire spell, you do additional damage equal to your level.


_________________
"Se o Destino for mesmo um Moinho...
Nós somos a razão que o faz se mover."



"Avançamos acreditando na sua infalibilidade,
Para além de onde as forças se encontram."



"Somos todos histórias no final.
Apenas façamos com que ela seja boa."
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Houserules

Mensagem por Leishuck Norris em Sab Maio 30, 2015 10:40 pm

Houserules
 
• Para facilitar a vida de todo mundo, inclusive a minha, em vez de sentenças e frases no Background, serão utilizados os antigos Kits do AD&D. Apenas o primeiro Kit ganha o benefício especial apresentado na adaptação, como o +2 gratuito no background, mas deve seguir o pré-requisito da classe sugerida – ou seja, o Barber como primeiro kit precisa ser um personagem Bardo ou Ladino pra poder ganhar os benefícios listados. Os demais kits podem ser escolhidos na quantidade que desejar, desde que não seja ultrapassada a pontuação limite de 5 pontos em um background e um total de 8 pontos a serem gastos – exceto em casos de feats ou talents que permitam isso.
 
• Será utilizado apenas o Core, pra facilitar a vida de todo mundo.
 
• Limite Inicial de valor de Atributo antes de adicionar valor da Raça e da Classe é de 15 – podendo chegar a 17 com o ajuste de raça ou de classe.
 
• A escala de HP não é 6, 7 e 8, mas sim 6, 8  e 10 – basta fazer a devida substituição de 7 pra 8 e de 8 pra 10.
 
• Para facilitar a vida novamente, alguns tipos de relacionamentos com os Icones podem ser vetados – não vou listar aqui quais seriam principalmente porque se a pessoa me der uma excelente justificativa que não deixe menos heroico o personagem, eu acho válido. Mas os Icones mais recomendados para ligações positivas são: The Grand Caliph; The Sheikh; The Slave General; The Warrior Queen; The White Agate. Os demais precisarão de uma boa justificativa.
 
• Dano de Acertos Críticos utilizará o valor máximo do dano (incluindo modificadores) e se rolará uma segunda vez (incluindo novamente os modificadores).
 
• O sistema de avanço de nível será conforme a regra “Incremental Advance” apresentada na pág 189. O jogo será dividido em marcos, onde alcançar um marco se consegue uma característica, no 5º marco após a passagem de nível anterior, há a passagem completa de nível.
 
• Pra facilitar a vida também, serão utilizados os Rituais da 4ª edição do D&D.
 
• A mecânica de Pontos Heróicos será utilizada, conforme Quadro Abaixo.
 
Pontos Heróicos
 
Gastar um ponto heróico é uma ação livre, que não consome tempo algum (a menos que outra regra adiante diga o contrário). Você pode gastar quantos pontos heroicos tiver, mas apenas um para cada benefício por turno. Com o gasto de um ponto heróico você pode:
 
• Adicionar um dado a uma jogada ou teste. Você deve usar o ponto heróico depois de rolar o dado, mas antes do mestre dizer se você foi bem-sucedido ou não. O valor do dado a ser adicionado depende do estágio: 1d6 no Aventureiro, 1d8 no Campeão, 1d10 no Épico.
• Maximizar o resultado dos dados do Recovery, seja em um combate ou fora dele.
• Re-rolar um teste mal sucedido, podendo escolher qualquer um dos resultados obtidos.
• Retcon, podendo criar um efeito de sorte que dê uma vantagem ao personagem durante a cena – como o vilão que acabou de escapar, deixar cair o mapa de sua base ou o personagem encontrar aquela chave da porta que precisa abrir debaixo de um carpete na entrada.
 
Você começa cada sessão de jogo (isto é, cada vez que reúne-se com seus amigos para jogar) com um ponto heroico por nível do personagem. Durante a aventura, pode ganhar mais através de heroísmo, interpretação e intervenção do mestre:
 
Heroísmo. Você ganha pontos de ação por atos de heroísmo. O ato deve ser realmente valoroso e altruísta. Espancar um bando de ghouls que não representa ameaça real não é heroísmo, mas escolher ser atingido no lugar de um amigo é. Resgatar pessoas de uma estalagem em chamas é heroísmo. Render-se para um vilão, a fim de salvar as vidas dos reféns, é heroísmo. Permitir que um vilão fuja enquanto você acalma uma fera enfurecida antes que ela ataque um inocente é heroísmo. O mestre decide se um ato específico é heroico o bastante, e deve fornecer aos jogadores muitas oportunidades para heroísmo.
 
Interpretação. Quando você diz algo inspirado, que faz todos na mesa rirem ou aplaudirem, pode ganhar um ponto heróico. Isto não vale apenas para diálogos: se fizer uma descrição fantástica da ação de seu herói — ou qualquer coisa que ajude a entreter o grupo de alguma outra forma — você também pode merecer um ponto heróico.
 
Intervenção do mestre. Você ganha pontos heróicos quando o mestre “torce” as regras do jogo em favor dos vilões. O mestre essencialmente tem o direito de “roubar” em favor dos vilões, mas os jogadores ganham pontos heróicos quando isso acontece. De modo geral, sempre que viola as regras para causar algum problema aos heróis, os jogadores ganham pontos heróicos. Alguns exemplos de intervenção do mestre incluem:
 
• Permitir que um vilão escape automaticamente. As circunstâncias conspiram para permitir que o vilão fuja livre — destroços barram a perseguição, o vilão desaparece em uma explosão ou cai para uma “morte” misteriosa, e assim por diante.
• Fazer com que um personagem jogador falhe automaticamente em um teste de resistência contra um perigo específico (como a armadilha de um vilão) para ajudar a mover a trama adiante.
• Fazer com que os heróis sejam automaticamente surpreendidos por um oponente.
• Dar a um personagem não jogador o benefício de um ponto heróico. Isto é importante, já que apenas os heróis possuem e ganham pontos heróicos.
 
Pontos heróicos não gastos não permanecem para a próxima sessão; você recomeça com um ponto por nível do personagem, mais uma vez.



_________________
"Se o Destino for mesmo um Moinho...
Nós somos a razão que o faz se mover."



"Avançamos acreditando na sua infalibilidade,
Para além de onde as forças se encontram."



"Somos todos histórias no final.
Apenas façamos com que ela seja boa."
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Leishuck Norris
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